Ski jumping is a winter sport in which competitors aim to achieve the longest jump after descending from a specially designed ramp on their skis. Along with jump length, competitor’s style and other factors affect the final score. Ski jumping was first contested in Norway in the late 19th century, and later spread through Europe and North America in the early 20th century. Along with cross-country skiing, it constitutes the traditional group of Nordic skiing disciplines. 

Ski jumping has been included at the Winter Olympics since 1924 and at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships since 1925. Women’s participation in the sport began in the 1990s, while the first women’s event at the Olympics has been held in 2014. Stefan Kraft holds the official record for the world’s longest ski jump with 253.5 metres (832 ft), set on the ski flying hill in Vikersund in 2017.

 

Age categories

Men & Women: 30+, 35+, 40+, 45+, 50+, 55+, 60+, 65+, 70+, 75+, 80+.

Masters competitors must have reached their 30th birthday by December 31st of the year prior to the event to be permitted to take part in the WWMG. 

 

Possible events and disciplines

Every competitor can participate two (2) personal competitions organized in two different size hills. You can choose 1-2 hills with a K-point next to each other.

Ski Jumping

Individual
HS 42
HS 75
HS 109

Team Competition
HS 75

Teams are composed of four athletes. Mixed- and Multinational-Teams are allowed to register. Teams should have one jumper from each following age groups: 30+, 40+, 50+ and 60+. An athlete can also represent his/ her team in an age group younger than the athlete’s own age.

Nordic Combined

Individual Gundersen HS42/ HS 75

Nordic combined will be organized following the Gundersen method and free style. For Nordic combined, only one (1), the first jump from the relevant ski jumping competition is counted. This is HS 75 for classes below 60 years and HS 42 for classes over 60 years of age.

 

Past Results

View the WWMG Bled 2010 Ski Jumping Results
View the WWMG Innsbruck 2020 Ski Jumping Results


The IMGA doesn’t allow building new venues and encourages the host cities to use existing facilities to keep the costs lower. Therefore, the following information is subject to changes depending on the venues available.

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